Koofers

EXAM 2 - Flashcards

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Class:COMM 1310 - FUND OF HUMAN COM
Subject:Communication Studies
University:Texas State University - San Marcos
Term:Fall 2013
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Interpersonal Communication communication between 2 people who both try and mutually influence one another; for managing relationships
Impersonal Communication communication that treats people as objects or that responds onl to their roles rather than to who they are a unique people
Short Term Initial Attraction degree of potential for developing an interpersonal relationship with someone
Long Term Maintenance Attraction level of liking or positive feeling tat motivates one to maintain or escalate a realationship
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Factors of Interpersonal Communication
  1. similarity
  2. physical attraction
  3. sexual attraction
  4. proximity
  5. complementarity
Similarity one's characteristics, values, attitudes, interests, or personality traits are like those of another person
Physical Attraction ones finds another person'ts physical self appealing
Sexual Attraction desire to have sexual contact with a certain person
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Proximity Likelyhood of being attracted to people who are physically close rather than to those who are farther away
Complementaity degree to which another person's different abilities, interests, and needs balance or round out ones own

Communication Strategys
  1. Passive
  2. Active
  3. Interactive
Passive Communication seek info by observing people, scoping out situations, and so forth before more actively working to reduce uncertainty

ex. reducing uncertainty by observing how people interact
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Active Communication after using passive observations, check perceptions with third party

ex. asking coworker about something associated with new job
Interactive Communication going directly to the person that could reduce uncertainty

ex. going to boss or to someone that has been in same position for a while
Reciprocity sharing info about oneself with another person with the expectation that the other person will share info that is similar in risk or debth
Self-Disclosure voluntary providing info to others that they would not learn if one did not tell them
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2 Models of Self-Disclosure
  1. Social Penetration Model
  2. Johari Window
Social Penetration Model a model of self disclosure that asserts that both the breadth and the depth of info shared with another person increases as the relationship develops.
Johari Window model of self disclosure varies from relationship to relationship; reflects various stages of relational development, degrees of self awareness, and others perceptions
Stages of Relational Development
  1. Pre-interaction
  2. initiation
  3. exploration
  4. intensification
  5. intimacy
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Per-Interaction stage of becoming aware of one's attraction to another person and observing that person but not actually interacting

Initiation first contact with a person with whom desires a relationship; usually characterized by asking and answering questions

Exploration involves more in-depth interactions
Intensification partners begin to depend on each other for self-confirmation; characterized by more shared activities, more time spent together
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Intimacy partners provide primary confirmation of each other's self concept
Relational De-Escalation Stages
  1. turmoil
  2. stagnation
  3. de-intensification
  4. individualization
  5. separation
  6. post-interaction 
Turmoil increase conflict, less mutual acceptance, a tense communicate climate, and an unclear relationship definition
Stagnation relationship loses its vitality, partners begin to take each other for granted; communication and physical contact decline
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De-Intensification decrease in interaction, increased distance, and decreases dependence on one's partner for self-confirmation
Individualization partners define their lives more as individuals and less as a couople
Seperation individuals make an intention decision to minimize or eliminate further interpersonal interaction
Post-Interaction final stage which represents the lasting effects of a relationship on the self
Generated by Koofers.com
Interpersonal Power ability to influence another in the direction one desires
Three Types of Relationships
  1. Complimentary
  2. Symmetrical
  3. Parallel
Complimentary Relationship one partner willingly and continuously cedes power to the other
Symmetrical Relationship similar control behaviors in partners. Partners to compete to dominate each other or both relinquish control to the other to avoid making decisions.
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Parallel Relationship power continually shifts from one partner to the other
Assertive Communication takes a listener's feelings and rights into account
Aggressive Communication self-serving communication that does not take a listener's feelings and rights into account
Non-confrontational Style conflict management style that involves backing off, avoiding conflict, or giving into the other person
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Confrontational Style win-lose approach to conflict management in which one person wants control and to win at the expense of the other
Cooperative Style conflict is viewed as a set of problems to be solved rather than as a competition in which one person wins and another loses
Team coordinated group of people organized to work together to achieve a specific common goal
Types of Groups
  1. primary
  2. social
  3. secondary
  4. study
  5. therapy
  6. problem-solving
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Primary Groups group, such as a family, that exists to fulfill basic human needs
Social Groups exists to provide opportunities for group members to enjoy an activity in the company of others
Secondary Group group formed to accomplish a specific task or goal
Study Group exists to help group members learn new information and ideas
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Therapy Group provides treatment for problems that group members may have
Problem-Solving Group meets to seek a solution to a problem and achieve a goal
Roles Within A Group
  1. Task
  2. Social
  3. Individual
Task Group role that helps a group achieve its goal to accomplish its work
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Social Group Role that helps a group manage relationships and affects the group climate
Individual Group role that focuses attention on the individual rather than on the group
Norms standards that determine what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior in a group
Status individuals importance and prestige
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Power the ability to influence other people's behavior
Types of Power
  1. legitimate
  2. referent
  3. expert
  4. reward
  5. coercive
Legitimate Power stems from being elected or appointed to be a position of authority
Referent Power stems from being liked
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Expert Power derived from having expertise and infromation
Reward Power comes from ability to provide rewards or favors
Coercive Power stems from being able to punish others
Group Cohesiveness degree of attraction group members feel toward on another and toward their group
Generated by Koofers.com
Fishers Stages of Group Talk
  1. Orientation
  2. conflict
  3. emergence
  4. reinforcement
Orientation Stage 1st phase, members become adjusted to one another and to the group's task

Conflict Stage 2nd phase; group members experience some degree of disagreement about social and task issues
Emergence Stage 3rd phase; conflict or disagreement is managed decisions are made, and group problems begin to be solved or managed
Generated by Koofers.com
Reinforcement Stage 4th phase; group members express positive feelings toward one another and toward the group
What effective group members do:
  1. identify and implement key functions to achieve results
  2. identify a clear, elevating goal
  3. develop a results-driven structure
  4. gather and share appropriate information
  5. develop options
  6. evaluate ideas
  7. develop sensitivity toward others
  8. develop a positive personal style
Structure the way a group or team discussion is organized, focusing on the group's agenda and the task that needs to be achieved

Interaction the give-and-take discussion and responsiveness to other group members
Generated by Koofers.com
John Deweys Relflective process to group problem solving:
  1. identify and define the problem
  2. analyze the problem
  3. generate creative solutions
  4. select the best solution
  5. take action
Brainstorming technique for generating many possible solutions to a problem by withholding evaluation while group members suggest ideas
Groupthink faulty sense of agreement that occurs when members of a group fail to challenge an idea
Generated by Koofers.com

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 Interpersonal Communicationcommunication between 2 people who both try and mutually influence one another; for managing relationships
 Impersonal Communicationcommunication that treats people as objects or that responds onl to their roles rather than to who they are a unique people
 Short Term Initial Attractiondegree of potential for developing an interpersonal relationship with someone
 Long Term Maintenance Attractionlevel of liking or positive feeling tat motivates one to maintain or escalate a realationship
 Factors of Interpersonal Communication
  1. similarity
  2. physical attraction
  3. sexual attraction
  4. proximity
  5. complementarity
 Similarityone's characteristics, values, attitudes, interests, or personality traits are like those of another person
 Physical Attractionones finds another person'ts physical self appealing
 Sexual Attractiondesire to have sexual contact with a certain person
 ProximityLikelyhood of being attracted to people who are physically close rather than to those who are farther away
 Complementaitydegree to which another person's different abilities, interests, and needs balance or round out ones own

 Communication Strategys
  1. Passive
  2. Active
  3. Interactive
 Passive Communicationseek info by observing people, scoping out situations, and so forth before more actively working to reduce uncertainty

ex. reducing uncertainty by observing how people interact
 Active Communicationafter using passive observations, check perceptions with third party

ex. asking coworker about something associated with new job
 Interactive Communicationgoing directly to the person that could reduce uncertainty

ex. going to boss or to someone that has been in same position for a while
 Reciprocitysharing info about oneself with another person with the expectation that the other person will share info that is similar in risk or debth
 Self-Disclosurevoluntary providing info to others that they would not learn if one did not tell them
 2 Models of Self-Disclosure
  1. Social Penetration Model
  2. Johari Window
 Social Penetration Modela model of self disclosure that asserts that both the breadth and the depth of info shared with another person increases as the relationship develops.
 Johari Windowmodel of self disclosure varies from relationship to relationship; reflects various stages of relational development, degrees of self awareness, and others perceptions
 Stages of Relational Development
  1. Pre-interaction
  2. initiation
  3. exploration
  4. intensification
  5. intimacy
 Per-Interactionstage of becoming aware of one's attraction to another person and observing that person but not actually interacting

 Initiationfirst contact with a person with whom desires a relationship; usually characterized by asking and answering questions

 Explorationinvolves more in-depth interactions
 Intensificationpartners begin to depend on each other for self-confirmation; characterized by more shared activities, more time spent together
 Intimacypartners provide primary confirmation of each other's self concept
 Relational De-Escalation Stages
  1. turmoil
  2. stagnation
  3. de-intensification
  4. individualization
  5. separation
  6. post-interaction 
 Turmoilincrease conflict, less mutual acceptance, a tense communicate climate, and an unclear relationship definition
 Stagnationrelationship loses its vitality, partners begin to take each other for granted; communication and physical contact decline
 De-Intensificationdecrease in interaction, increased distance, and decreases dependence on one's partner for self-confirmation
 Individualizationpartners define their lives more as individuals and less as a couople
 Seperationindividuals make an intention decision to minimize or eliminate further interpersonal interaction
 Post-Interactionfinal stage which represents the lasting effects of a relationship on the self
 Interpersonal Powerability to influence another in the direction one desires
 Three Types of Relationships
  1. Complimentary
  2. Symmetrical
  3. Parallel
 Complimentary Relationshipone partner willingly and continuously cedes power to the other
 Symmetrical Relationshipsimilar control behaviors in partners. Partners to compete to dominate each other or both relinquish control to the other to avoid making decisions.
 Parallel Relationshippower continually shifts from one partner to the other
 Assertive Communicationtakes a listener's feelings and rights into account
 Aggressive Communicationself-serving communication that does not take a listener's feelings and rights into account
 Non-confrontational Styleconflict management style that involves backing off, avoiding conflict, or giving into the other person
 Confrontational Stylewin-lose approach to conflict management in which one person wants control and to win at the expense of the other
 Cooperative Styleconflict is viewed as a set of problems to be solved rather than as a competition in which one person wins and another loses
 Teamcoordinated group of people organized to work together to achieve a specific common goal
 Types of Groups
  1. primary
  2. social
  3. secondary
  4. study
  5. therapy
  6. problem-solving
 Primary Groupsgroup, such as a family, that exists to fulfill basic human needs
 Social Groupsexists to provide opportunities for group members to enjoy an activity in the company of others
 Secondary Groupgroup formed to accomplish a specific task or goal
 Study Groupexists to help group members learn new information and ideas
 Therapy Groupprovides treatment for problems that group members may have
 Problem-Solving Groupmeets to seek a solution to a problem and achieve a goal
 Roles Within A Group
  1. Task
  2. Social
  3. Individual
 Task Grouprole that helps a group achieve its goal to accomplish its work
 Social GroupRole that helps a group manage relationships and affects the group climate
 Individual Grouprole that focuses attention on the individual rather than on the group
 Normsstandards that determine what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior in a group
 Statusindividuals importance and prestige
 Powerthe ability to influence other people's behavior
 Types of Power
  1. legitimate
  2. referent
  3. expert
  4. reward
  5. coercive
 Legitimate Powerstems from being elected or appointed to be a position of authority
 Referent Powerstems from being liked
 Expert Powerderived from having expertise and infromation
 Reward Powercomes from ability to provide rewards or favors
 Coercive Powerstems from being able to punish others
 Group Cohesivenessdegree of attraction group members feel toward on another and toward their group
 Fishers Stages of Group Talk
  1. Orientation
  2. conflict
  3. emergence
  4. reinforcement
 Orientation Stage1st phase, members become adjusted to one another and to the group's task

 Conflict Stage2nd phase; group members experience some degree of disagreement about social and task issues
 Emergence Stage3rd phase; conflict or disagreement is managed decisions are made, and group problems begin to be solved or managed
 Reinforcement Stage4th phase; group members express positive feelings toward one another and toward the group
 What effective group members do:
  1. identify and implement key functions to achieve results
  2. identify a clear, elevating goal
  3. develop a results-driven structure
  4. gather and share appropriate information
  5. develop options
  6. evaluate ideas
  7. develop sensitivity toward others
  8. develop a positive personal style
 Structurethe way a group or team discussion is organized, focusing on the group's agenda and the task that needs to be achieved

 Interactionthe give-and-take discussion and responsiveness to other group members
 John Deweys Relflective process to group problem solving:
  1. identify and define the problem
  2. analyze the problem
  3. generate creative solutions
  4. select the best solution
  5. take action
 Brainstormingtechnique for generating many possible solutions to a problem by withholding evaluation while group members suggest ideas
 Groupthinkfaulty sense of agreement that occurs when members of a group fail to challenge an idea
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