Koofers

Quiz 4 - Flashcards

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Class:PHIL 1504 - Language and Logic
Subject:Philosophy
University:Virginia Polytechnic Institute And State University
Term:Fall 2015
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Rhetorical devices
  • usually single words or short phrases designed to give a statement a positive or negative slant. Sometimes called slanters

ex:
Dysphemism
  • used to produce a negative effect on someone's attitude about something, or tone down the positive associations it may have.

ex: EATING an animal flesh instead of saying eating animal meat. sounding worse than it is. negative.
Weaselers
  • Help to protect it from criticism by watering it down somewhat, weakening it, and giving the claim's author a way out in case the claim is challenged

ex:"up to"    allowing the claim to not be held accountable 

once you've made our day planner apart of your business life, there's a goof chance you'll never miss or be late for another appointment.
Euphemisms
  • Is neautral or positive expression used in place of one that carries negative associations. "detainee"  what most of us call :prisoner"

ex:Career enhancement opportunity. aka you've been fired.
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Down players
  • aTTEMPT to make someone or something look less important or less significant. 

ex: she got her degree "from correspondence school".

john "borrowed" a umbrella  , and hank hasn't seen it since.
stereotypes
  • is a cultural belief or idea about a social group's attributes, usually simplified or exaggereated. 

ex: " women with short hair are gay"

"people with tattoos waste their money"
" he's black so he is really athletic 
Innuendo
  • Uses the power of suggestions to disparage (say something bad about someone or something.

ex: ladies and gentlemen, I am proof that atleast one canidate in this race doesn't make stuff up"

not saying  the opponent is making stuff up but it conveys that message.
Loaded question
  •  like innuendo, implying something without coming out and saying it.

ex " why does the president hate rich people?"

have you always liked being in debt?
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rhetorical definitions
  • employ rhetorically charged language to express or elicit an attitude about something.


ex:  abortion= the murder of an unborn child 
rhetorical explanation
  • Uses the language of standard explanations to disguise  their real purpose, which is to express or elicit an attitude.

"
ex:  yeah no blue is my favorite color, very calming, very cool, why does anyone like blue anymore? 

convincing someone to like the color blue

rhetorical analogy
  • likenes two or more thing to make one of them appear better or worse than another.
  • comparing things to one another

ex: Obama is abrahm Lincoln as  sudam usam is to adolf hitler.
proof surrogate
  • suggests there Is evidence or authority for a claim without actually citing such evidence or authoruity.

ex:  everyone obviously  blue is a better color than orange

"obviously" makes it seem like u have data but u dont
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repetition
  • staying the same thing over and over again 

ex: campaign signs every where. Same thing basically 
hyperbole
  •  A giant exaggeration 


ex: that women is as big as a house


obviously not big as a house
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 Rhetorical devices
  • usually single words or short phrases designed to give a statement a positive or negative slant. Sometimes called slanters

ex:
 Dysphemism
  • used to produce a negative effect on someone's attitude about something, or tone down the positive associations it may have.

ex: EATING an animal flesh instead of saying eating animal meat. sounding worse than it is. negative.
 Weaselers
  • Help to protect it from criticism by watering it down somewhat, weakening it, and giving the claim's author a way out in case the claim is challenged

ex:"up to"    allowing the claim to not be held accountable 

once you've made our day planner apart of your business life, there's a goof chance you'll never miss or be late for another appointment.
 Euphemisms
  • Is neautral or positive expression used in place of one that carries negative associations. "detainee"  what most of us call :prisoner"

ex:Career enhancement opportunity. aka you've been fired.
 Down players
  • aTTEMPT to make someone or something look less important or less significant. 

ex: she got her degree "from correspondence school".

john "borrowed" a umbrella  , and hank hasn't seen it since.
 stereotypes
  • is a cultural belief or idea about a social group's attributes, usually simplified or exaggereated. 

ex: " women with short hair are gay"

"people with tattoos waste their money"
" he's black so he is really athletic 
 Innuendo
  • Uses the power of suggestions to disparage (say something bad about someone or something.

ex: ladies and gentlemen, I am proof that atleast one canidate in this race doesn't make stuff up"

not saying  the opponent is making stuff up but it conveys that message.
 Loaded question
  •  like innuendo, implying something without coming out and saying it.

ex " why does the president hate rich people?"

have you always liked being in debt?
 rhetorical definitions
  • employ rhetorically charged language to express or elicit an attitude about something.


ex:  abortion= the murder of an unborn child 
 rhetorical explanation
  • Uses the language of standard explanations to disguise  their real purpose, which is to express or elicit an attitude.

"
ex:  yeah no blue is my favorite color, very calming, very cool, why does anyone like blue anymore? 

convincing someone to like the color blue

 rhetorical analogy
  • likenes two or more thing to make one of them appear better or worse than another.
  • comparing things to one another

ex: Obama is abrahm Lincoln as  sudam usam is to adolf hitler.
 proof surrogate
  • suggests there Is evidence or authority for a claim without actually citing such evidence or authoruity.

ex:  everyone obviously  blue is a better color than orange

"obviously" makes it seem like u have data but u dont
 repetition
  • staying the same thing over and over again 

ex: campaign signs every where. Same thing basically 
 hyperbole
  •  A giant exaggeration 


ex: that women is as big as a house


obviously not big as a house
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