Koofers

pols 2311 - Flashcards

Flashcard Deck Information

Class:POLS 2311 - GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Subject:Political Science
University:University of Texas - Arlington
Term:Spring 2011
- of -
INCORRECT CORRECT
- INCORRECT     - CORRECT     - SKIPPED
Shuffle Remaining Cards Show Definitions First Take Quiz (NEW)
Hide Keyboard shortcuts
Next card
Previous card
Mark correct
Mark incorrect
Flip card
Start Over
Shuffle
      Mode:   CARDS LIST       ? pages   PRINT EXIT
what are socialization agents? people or institutions that help us figure out our own values- media, school, family, church
Campaigning media use, stump speech, war chest, time line, name recognition
Party National Conventions kickoff to the general election season
Obscenity test test used to determine if the work lacks literary value. checks for libel and slander
Generated by Koofers.com
franking free mailing privileges for a elected official to his/her congressional district
pork barrel Pork barrel is a derogatory term referring to appropriation of government spending for localized projects secured solely or primarily to bring money to a representative's district.
example: using federal money to build roads in his district
who is the secretary of state hilary clinton
PAC political action committee
Generated by Koofers.com
motor voter bill asking people if they want to register for voting while they renew their drivers license
stump speech A political stump speech is a standard speech used by a politician running for office.
Jacksonian democracy Jacksonian democracy is the political philosophy of United States politician Andrew Jackson and his supporters.
cabinet secretaries A Cabinet Secretary is almost always a senior official who provides services and advice to a Cabinet of Ministers.
Generated by Koofers.com
politics Politics, is a process by which groups of people make collective decisions.
penny press Penny press newspapers were cheap, tabloid-style papers produced in the middle of the 19th century.
Virginia plan The Virginia Plan was a proposal by Virginia delegates, drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Constitutional Convention of 1787.
New Jersey plan The New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government proposed by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787. The plan was created in response to the Virginia Plan's call for two houses of Congress, both elected with apportionment according to population or direct taxes paid.
Generated by Koofers.com
Townshend Act The Townshend Acts were a series of laws passed beginning in 1767 by the Parliament of Great Britain relating to the British colonies in North America.
john locke John Locke (; 29 August 1632 - 28 October 1704), widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers.
social contract The social contract is an intellectual device intended to explain the appropriate relationship between individuals and their governments.
French and Indian war The French and Indian War is the common U.S.
Generated by Koofers.com
full faith and credit clause The Full Faith and Credit Clause is the familiar name used to refer to Article IV, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, which addresses the duties that states within the United States have to respect the "public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state." According to the Supreme Court, there is a difference between the credit owed to laws (i.e.
Gitlow v. New York
Schenck v. United States
Joseph McCarthy Joseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy (November 14, 1908 May 2, 1957) was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S.
Generated by Koofers.com
clear and present danger test Clear and present danger was a term used by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
Gideon Gideon or Gedeon, which means "Destroyer," "Mighty warrior," or "Feller (of trees)" was judge of the Hebrews.
Smith Act The Alien Registration Act or Smith Act of 1940 is a United States federal statute that set criminal penalties for advocating the overthrow of the U.S.
Sedition Act The Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills passed in 1798 by the Federalists in the 5th United States Congress during an undeclared naval war with France, later known as the Quasi-War.
Generated by Koofers.com
Espionage Act The Espionage Act of 1917 is a United States federal law passed on June 15, 1917, shortly after the U.S.
New York Times Co. v. Sullivan New York Times Co. v.
Generated by Koofers.com

List View: Terms & Definitions

  Hide All 30 Print
 
Front
Back
 what are socialization agents?people or institutions that help us figure out our own values- media, school, family, church
 Campaigningmedia use, stump speech, war chest, time line, name recognition
 Party National Conventionskickoff to the general election season
 Obscenity testtest used to determine if the work lacks literary value. checks for libel and slander
 frankingfree mailing privileges for a elected official to his/her congressional district
 pork barrelPork barrel is a derogatory term referring to appropriation of government spending for localized projects secured solely or primarily to bring money to a representative's district.
example: using federal money to build roads in his district
 who is the secretary of statehilary clinton
 PACpolitical action committee
 motor voter billasking people if they want to register for voting while they renew their drivers license
 stump speechA political stump speech is a standard speech used by a politician running for office.
 Jacksonian democracyJacksonian democracy is the political philosophy of United States politician Andrew Jackson and his supporters.
 cabinet secretariesA Cabinet Secretary is almost always a senior official who provides services and advice to a Cabinet of Ministers.
 politicsPolitics, is a process by which groups of people make collective decisions.
 penny pressPenny press newspapers were cheap, tabloid-style papers produced in the middle of the 19th century.
 Virginia planThe Virginia Plan was a proposal by Virginia delegates, drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Constitutional Convention of 1787.
 New Jersey planThe New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government proposed by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787. The plan was created in response to the Virginia Plan's call for two houses of Congress, both elected with apportionment according to population or direct taxes paid.
 Townshend ActThe Townshend Acts were a series of laws passed beginning in 1767 by the Parliament of Great Britain relating to the British colonies in North America.
 john lockeJohn Locke (; 29 August 1632 - 28 October 1704), widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers.
 social contractThe social contract is an intellectual device intended to explain the appropriate relationship between individuals and their governments.
 French and Indian warThe French and Indian War is the common U.S.
 full faith and credit clauseThe Full Faith and Credit Clause is the familiar name used to refer to Article IV, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, which addresses the duties that states within the United States have to respect the "public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state." According to the Supreme Court, there is a difference between the credit owed to laws (i.e.
 Gitlow v. New York 
 Schenck v. United States 
 Joseph McCarthyJoseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy (November 14, 1908 May 2, 1957) was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S.
 clear and present danger testClear and present danger was a term used by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
 GideonGideon or Gedeon, which means "Destroyer," "Mighty warrior," or "Feller (of trees)" was judge of the Hebrews.
 Smith ActThe Alien Registration Act or Smith Act of 1940 is a United States federal statute that set criminal penalties for advocating the overthrow of the U.S.
 Sedition ActThe Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills passed in 1798 by the Federalists in the 5th United States Congress during an undeclared naval war with France, later known as the Quasi-War.
 Espionage ActThe Espionage Act of 1917 is a United States federal law passed on June 15, 1917, shortly after the U.S.
 New York Times Co. v. SullivanNew York Times Co. v.
36, "/var/app/current/tmp/"